School-Wide Behavior Program

Quail Hollow Elementary School

School-Wide Positive Behavior Supports and Interventions

2012 - 2013

School Beliefs


 

Our Mission:  Our mission at Quail Hollow Elementary is to prepare students for a quality life.

Our Motto:  Our Quest for Quality is to be College and Career Ready

Our Responsibility: Elementary aged students need instruction in social skills, just as they need instruction in reading, writing and math.  We explicitly teach social skills, provide guided practice of the skills and reinforcement during independent practice of the skills.  Our goal is to help them master key social skills.  We know they will make errors during the instructional process.  We will help students correct current errors and work at preventing future errors.


School Rules


“The Three Bees”

BE SAFE                      

BE RESPECTFUL                  

BE RESPOSIBLE

 

Major / Minor Rule Violations


 



Minor Rule Violations

Teacher

Prompts/Re-teach/Think Time

Major Rule Violations

Principal

Individualized Interventions

  1. Talking Out
  2. Off task
  3. Pushing/Shoving
  4. Arguing/back Talk
  5. Obscenities
  6. Dress code violations
  7. Gum chewing
  8. Electronic devices not used appropriately
  9. Hats on in school
  10. Throwing paper/small objects
  11. Minor vandalism
  12. Troubling schoolwork 
  13. Cheating
  14. Lying
  15. Inappropriate noises
  16. Disturbing classes (knocking on doors or windows, loud in hallways)
 

  1. Fighting
  2. Name calling involving racial slurs or sexual taunts
  3. Bullying (as per the Quail Hollow   definition)
  4. Threats
  5. Weapons
  6. Illegal substances
  7. Vandalism
  8. Repeated incidences of minor behaviors not changed by teacher intervention.
  9. Snowballs
  10. Throwing food/objects
  11. Spitting/Biting others
  12. Uncontrollable tantrums




 

Minor violations are taken care of by the teacher/staff member.  Major violations are referred to the office for the principal to handle.  Please use a behavior referral form when sending students to the office.  The Quail Hollow School Procedures Matrix: Quail Hollow’s 3 Bes follows.  These are rules for common areas of the school.


Quail Hollow’s Three


Bullying Vs. Bad Behavior



At Quail Hollow:

            Bullying is one-sided.

            Bullying is intentional and repetitive.

            Bullying involves an imbalance of strength and power.

            Bullying happens when someone purposely hurts, frightens or threatens someone else.

            Bullying happens when someone purposely and repeatedly excludes others, ridicules, spreads rumors, or makes offensive comments.



Bullying is Different from Bad Behavior:

            Not all meanness and cruelty is bullying. Kids hurt each other sometimes. They say nasty things. They get into fights and push each other (or worse). They write stupid and mean things in email or social media. However, it isn’t bullying unless it is repetitive and intentional.



            Bad behavior is something that a child does that hurts another arbitrarily. Some physical aggression is an instinctive reaction to feelings of frustration or anger.  It isn’t preplanned. Bad behavior is typically random. Any child who engages in meanness, physical aggression and other types of bad behavior is subject to appropriate consequences, but these consequences are not the consequences used for bullying.




Quail Hollow Think Time Procedures

Classroom Procedures



Philosophy We believe that all students deserve a positive educational environment for academic and social growth. The use of Think Time is a response to disruptive behavior teachers are encouraged to use.  Used in conjunction with other strategies, Think Time helps ensure a safe and positive learning environment for all students.



Rules for Other Areas of the School   See School Procedures Matrix:  Quail Hollow’s 3 Bes



Classroom Rules and Procedures must be established and posted in each classroom.  School procedures are based upon the school rules of be safe, be respectful, and be responsible.  Individual teachers will add specific rules and procedures for their classrooms.  All rules and procedures are taught and practiced so that students know what the rules look like and sound like.



1.     Warnings/Precision Commands   If a student violates a classroom rule, a precision command should be used. Preventative measures like having a signal to secure student attention (bell, hand signal, clapping) and using direct speech.  Direct speech means that the student is given clear, concise, positive directions – e.g. asking the student to finish the problems on page 5, then walking away, but still in the vicinity of the student.  Then giving a warning, “you have been asked to finish the problems on page 5, if you choose to do that you can go out to recess, if you choose not to work now you need to stay in for recess and complete the work.”  If the student doesn’t comply, very matter-of-factly deliver the consequence that was determined. Communication by the teacher prior to using Think Time is limited, unemotional, and matter-of-fact. 



  1. Example: The teacher states:
                                               i.     First Warning:          Johnny, return to your seat (whatever is appropriate for the misbehavior)

                                             ii.     Second Warning:      Johnny, second warning.  You need to sit down in your seat.

                                            iii.     Third Warning:         Johnny, you are still out of your seat.  Take a Think Time in (designated area)





    1. Think Time may be held in the same grade or another grade level to make it more effective.


1.     Leave the Classroom   The student is given a Think Time pass and walks to the entrance of the cooperating teacher’s classroom and stands quietly by a WAIT sign until the cooperating teacher has a moment to invite him into the classroom and direct him to the Think Time area.  The Think Time desk is located in an area in the classroom that is free from distractions and limits the ability of the student to engage the teacher or other students.





  1. NOTE: Children learn in this process that class instruction is important.  Neither teacher allows the Think Time student to interrupt the teaching.  The student may have to stand and wait a few minutes.  The students in BOTH classes have been trained not to look at, acknowledge, or react in any way to the Think Time student.  If a student does look at, acknowledge, or react to a Think Time student, they are also given an immediate Think Time.


2.     Think and Respond Period   When the cooperating teacher has a moment, she/he walks to the Think Time student standing at the WAIT sign and asks him, “What was your behavior”?  If the student can describe the behavior, he is directed to the Think Time desk to complete a debriefing form.  If the student does not remember why he was sent to Think Time, he is asked to return to his classroom to discuss the reason with his teacher.  The student is expected to wait at the entrance of his classroom until the teacher has a break in teaching and recognizes him.  After discussing the issues, he returns to the cooperating teacher’s classroom where he once again waits to be ushered to the Think Time desk.  The student then completes the debriefing form.  There are several variations of debriefing forms appropriate for different grade levels and ability levels.  All debriefing forms should include areas to identify the inappropriate behavior the student displayed, identify what they need to do (a replacement behavior) when they return to their classroom, and indicate whether or not they think they can display the appropriate behavior.  The debriefing form should also offer the student an opportunity to request a conference with their classroom teacher if needed.  Each classroom is equipped with a Think Time desk, chair, debriefing forms, pencils, and a Think Time Procedure chart.



3.     Return to Classroom   When the student finishes filling out the debriefing form by identifying the misbehavior and stating how he will improve his actions in the future, he waits patiently for the cooperating teacher to return to assist him.  At a convenient time, the cooperating teacher reviews the debriefing form with the student.  If it is complete and seems to be in order, the form is signed and the student is invited to return to his/her classroom.  (If it is not complete, the student is provided with more Think Time until the form is completed).  The student waits at the entrance of their classroom until the classroom teacher acknowledges him and reviews his debriefing form.  If it is accurately completed, the student is welcomed back into the room.  If it is not accurate, the student returns to Think Time, and the process is repeated. 



4.     Referral for students needing more intensive instruction for behavior and/or social skills.    If a student receives excessive Think Times during a single week or has a significant office referral, the teacher refers the student to the Student Intervention Team.  The team will provide interventions, which may include assigning the child to a social skills group where specific skills will be taught, practiced and reinforced.  This Tier II social skills group will be scheduled and supervised by the Achievement Coach.



5.     Recess loss may be used as a consequence for extreme, specific behaviors.  Behaviors included as Major Violations in the Major/Minor Rule Violations chart may result in loss of recess.  This time will be used to problem solve and develop a plan with the child to prevent the behavior from reoccurring. Students who lose recess for a major violation will be referred to the Student Intervention Team.



6.     Consistency School-Wide   Staff, other than the classroom teacher, may give a Think Time to any student.  Forms are provided for all staff members to refer students, other than their own, for Think Time.  A behavior referral form will be completed by the staff member and given to the child’s teacher if this occurs.



7.     Students for whom the Think Time System does not work   For 90% of the students, Think Time will be successful.  For the other students for whom Think Time does not seem to work, teachers may consider working with their grade level team to determine other strategies or interventions or refer the child to the Student Intervention Team for inclusion in a Tier II social skills group.



8.     Students on IEPs   If behavior goals are in the IEP, the IEP guidelines must be followed.  Teachers must consider a student’s disabilities when planning consequences and programs. Appropriate accommodations and modifications should be made as needed.  These may include very specific warnings, more cognitive processing time, more basic discussion of the offense, direct teaching of appropriate replacement behaviors, or shorter time in Think Time.  It is essential to consult with the special education team to ensure that Think Time procedures are adapted as needed for any students on an IEP.  IEP students may have Think Times in the resource area under supervision of the special ed. teacher.



Appendix



Quail Hollow Defines Bullying as:

            Bullying is one-sided.

            Bullying is intentional and repetitive.

            Bullying involves an imbalance of strength and power.

            Bullying happens when someone purposely hurts, frightens or threatens someone else.

            Bullying happens when someone purposely and repeatedly excludes others, ridicules, spreads rumors, or makes offensive comments.



Bullying is Different from Bad Behavior:

            Not all meanness and cruelty is bullying. Kids hurt each other sometimes. They say nasty things. They get into fights and push each other (or worse). They write stupid and mean things in email or social media. However, it isn’t bullying unless it is repetitive and intentional. Bad behavior is something that a child does that hurts another arbitrarily. Some physical aggression is an instinctive reaction to feelings of frustration or anger.  It isn’t preplanned. Bad behavior is typically random. Any child who engages in meanness, physical aggression and other types of bad behavior is subject to appropriate consequences, but these consequences are not the consequences used for bullying.



Helpful Management Hints

1.     Always remain calm, kind, caring, and speak in polite, positive, respectful ways to students when implementing Think Time or any other consequence.  The goal of the student’s behavior may be to get the teacher’s attention, make the teacher angry or disgusted or to avoid work.  Provide them the opportunity to go to Think Time and then require them to complete all assigned work.  It is a good idea to make sure the student understands the expectation/requirement for completing a task, as this may be the cause for the misbehavior.

2.     The key to making this program work is to have engaging, exciting and fun learning activities happening in the classroom so that students feel they are missing something by being sent to Think Time.

3.     Be positive and point out what you wish the student to do rather than what you do not want him/her to do.

4.     It is helpful to have a poster hanging in the classroom (cafeteria, restrooms, halls, playground, etc.) listing the rules and basic steps for Think Time.

5.     Have a supply of Think Time cards available for use.

6.     Post a WAIT sign at the entrance of each classroom.

7.     Organize a Think Time area in each classroom consisting of a desk, chair, pencils, poster of Think Time procedures, and debriefing forms.

8.     Include Think Time procedures in your substitute plans.

9.     Behavioral referral report forms are to be used to report more serious issues to the principal.

10.  Serious issues always need to be reported to parents. 



Use of other consequences:  The use of Think Time is not viewed as the only response to disruptive behavior.  Use it with flexibility and other school and classroom strategies (proximity control, eye contact, warning systems like colored cards, loss of privilege, parent contact or meeting, etc.) and consequences.  Think Time in itself is a powerful enough response to most minor disruptive behaviors.  However, additional      contingencies such as principal intervention, parent contacts, counseling, special education behavioral referrals are established in the case of chronic disruptive behavior or challenging behavior.  Other consequences might include missing special assemblies and/or activities.  .





School-wide Positive Behavior and Interventions Support Program – Tier I: 

The school’s guidance counselor will meet with grade levels to provide specific lessons on social skills behaviors. A different social /character trait will be focused on each month. A poster defining the social skill and listing what the social skill/character trait looks like will be displayed in each classroom and in common areas of the school. The teachers and staff will reinforce the social skills taught and distribute Quality Quails to students demonstrating a feature of the social skill for the month.  A weekly drawing will be held, with one student per class being drawn, for a prize from the principal.  The drawing winners will be     announced during Monday Morning Announcements.



School-wide Positive Behavior and Interventions Support Program – Tier II

Students who are unsuccessful with behavior/social skills after initial instruction from the guidance specialist will be provided with additional instruction and support. A referral, indicating the problem the child is having, may be given to the achievement coach (who chairs the student intervention team).  The achievement coach will determine if the problem can be solved with a few skills training sessions or if it needs to be seen by the student intervention team.  The student intervention team will provide assistance to the classroom teacher in developing additional strategies to help the student.  These strategies may include additional social skills training in a small group setting, the use of a behavioral contract, modifications in the learning environment, or other individually developed plans.



Playground procedures and consequences:  Students are expected to follow the behavior expectations listed             on the School Procedures Matrix: Quail Hollow’s 3 Bes.  The playground aides will deliver        consequences in the following manner:

1.     If children are engaged in a conflict with each other, the aide will use the following Six Steps to Conflict Resolution.

• Approach the students involved in the conflict calmly

• Acknowledge the feelings you see the students displaying (e.g. I can see you are  

   frustrated, or you look angry).

• Gather information from each student about the problem

• Restate the problem to the students.

• Ask each student for a solution or solutions, then have the students choose one

   together

• Be prepared to give follow up support in using the solution

2.     If, after the conflict resolution process is completed, the students have a second incident, the students will be directed to take a time out on the “wall.”

3.     If, after the time out on the wall, a third problem occurs, the student is sent to the office for the rest of the recess to complete a Think Time.

4.     Any major rule offense will result in being sent to the office right away.



Cafeteria procedures and consequences: Students are expected to follow the behavior expectations listed on the School Procedures Matrix: Quail Hollow’s 3 Bes.  The cafeteria aides will deliver consequences in the following manner:



1.     If the problem is wide spread or if the noise level is too high, the aide will turn the lights out.  Students will stop all talking and not resume talking until the lights go back on.

2.     First problem or incidence of student breaking a rule will result in the aide using the Conflict Resolution Process detailed in the section on Playground Procedures. 

3.     A second problem involving the same student will result in time-out, which is moving the child to a separate table from their peers.

4.     A third problem involving the same student will result in being sent to the office for the rest of the lunch period to complete a Think Time.

5.     Any major rule violation will result in being sent to the office right away.



Assembly procedures and consequences:  Students are expected to follow the behavior expectations listed on the school areas/rules matrix.  During an assembly, the following consequences will apply:

·      First warning, student asked to improve behavior.

·      Second warning, student must sit by the teacher.

·      If the student’s behavior does not improve they will be sent to the main office for the rest of the assembly and complete a Think Time.

·      Any major offence will result in being sent to the office right away.



Characteristics of a safe school:

            * Positive school climate and atmosphere

            * Clear and high academic and disciplinary expectations of students

            * Strong student attachment to the school

            * High levels of both student participation and parent involvement

            * Values and practices that make everyone feel included; appreciation of diversity                

           (Source, Guidance for District-Level Hearings from Trends and Issues Affecting Safety, 2001)



Resource for Precision Commands:

            Best Behavior, Building Positive Behavior Support in Schools, pages 121-130.